Yellow-crowned Night Herons, by Janice Dahl

Rare sightings of a pair of Yellow-crowned Night-Herons started in April and have been found in El Dorado Park and the Nature Center.  Cindy Crawford took this photo at the creek on Snake Road.  They’re typically found in the southeast of the US, parts of Mexico, Central America, and coastal regions of South America.

The following is from AllAboutBirds.org: While not as slender as a typical heron, the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron’s smooth purple-gray colors, sharp black-and-white face, and long yellow plumes lend it a touch of elegance. They forage at all hours of the day and night, stalking crustaceans in shallow wetlands and wet fields. Their diet leans heavily on crabs and crayfish, which they catch with a lunge and shake apart, or swallow whole. They’re most common in coastal marshes, barrier islands, and mangroves, but their range extends inland as far as the Midwest.

International Migratory Bird Day Saturday 5-13-17, by Janice Dahl

In recognition of International Migratory Bird Day, El Dorado Audubon will be joining with El Dorado Park Nature Center for

 

Conservation the Length of the Americas

From Arctic tundra to South American wetlands

The birds of the Pacific Flyway depend on a diverse chain of habitats, from Arctic tundra and northwestern rainforest to tropical beaches and mangroves. Audubon’s network of chapters, volunteers, activists, and members is preserving and restoring these vital links along the way.

Each year at least a billion birds migrate along the Pacific Flyway, but these birds are only a fraction of those that used the flyway a century ago. Habitat loss, water shortages, diminishing food sources, and climate change all threaten the birds of the Pacific Flyway.

Save Los Cerritos Wetlands & Steam Shovel Slough, by Janice Dahl

El Dorado Audubon's CEQA attorney speaks before LCWA Board

El Dorado Audubon’s CEQA attorney, Doug Carstens, speaks before LCWA Board

El Dorado Audubon the only environmental group to defend Steam Shovel Slough, the last pristine historical remnant of Los Cerritos Wetlands that was the estuary of the San Gabriel River, before the river was imprisoned in concrete.  To read more go to www.lbreport.com/news/aug16/lcwa1.htm  by Bill Pearl.